Category Archives: Hadrian’s Wall Walk

Cross countryside

Countryside near Solway Firth, viewed from Boustead Hill, in Cumbria England.
View from Boustead hill north-ish across Solway Firth, the very distant land is Scotland.
Somewhere between Boustead hill and Carlisle.
Heading out into the countryside north-east of Carlisle.
Between Crosby-on Eden and Lanercost Abbey
The River Irthing from the Millenium Bridge between Birdoswald Fort and Gilsland.
Northumberland. I think these are from Windshield Crags (they might be Cawfield Crags).
View from Hotbank crags toward Cragfield Loch.
Countryside between Sewingshields and Brocolitia.
At Chester’s Fort in Chollerford looking toward the north fork of the Tyne River.
Farmland
More farmland
A creek flowing into the now very wide Tyne river as it approaches Newcastle-on-Tyne.

Last summer my husband and I walked across northern England on the Hadrian’s wall trail. The Lens Artists prompt: countryside, prompted me to go through my extensive collection of photos from that trip. There is one photo above from each day that is representative of the type of countryside we saw that day.

Where fairies live

Perhaps because we mostly have alder and evergreens locally I was quite fascinated by some of the trees, mostly I think they were sycamore, or plane trees, that we saw while walking Hadrian’s Wall National Trail in England last summer.

I think I love them because they remind me of fairy stories.

Lens Artists Photo Challenge #50: Trees

From Sea to Shining Sea

Our walk along Hadrian’s Wall Path last summer took us from Solway Firth on the west coast of England to (after a short metro ride from Wallsend) to the North Sea at Whitley Bay.

At the start of the 12 day walk we were up late (sunset was around 10 pm) and early, due to a combination of jet lag and adrenaline. The day after the walk we just went out after breakfast.

For Nancy Merrill’s Photo a Week: horizons.

Back to the Wall

I never finished the series of posts I intended to write about walking Hadrian’s Wall last June. 

Here is a gallery of pictures from the Hadrian’s Wall National Trail between Housesteads Fort and Chester’s Fort.

In this stretch, while not including the highest point on the walk, it passes something equivalent to the Continental divide in North America, the texture of the clouds changed, and it got way less windy.

Sheep with its fleece being blown by the wind.
The wind blew so hard it was shearing the sheep.

Son of a Beach’s Which Way Photo Challenge

The Sycamore of Sycamore Gap

The sycamore of sycamore Gap along Hadrian’s Wall in Northumbria is the most photographed tree in all of England. No surprise since it is perfectly framed by the dip in the terrain, which allowed it to grow by protecting it from the sometimes brutal winds of the area. The day we were there was a little blustery, giving us just a little taste of reality.

Here are my takes on this famous tree.

Black-&-White-Banner

 

Hadrian’s Wall Walk: Steel Rigg to Housesteads Fort

We took an extra day on our walk in the middle of our trip, an area which is remote and therefore more intact sections of the wall and forts. If you ever do the walk think about it. It give you lots of time to enjoy the area, and to take a break during the storms.

In this area the wall is built along the edge of cliffs. It is fairly vigorous walking, and some of the steep, rocky areas are a bit treacherous when wet.

This section contains a lot of lovely scenery, even on a cloudy day, including the most photographed tree in England: the sycamore of sycamore gap. It is a striking site: a large healthy sycamore tucked into a gap in the cliffs.

The walking part, for us, was from the Steel Rigg visitor center to Housesteads Fort.

We took the bus from Housesteads past Steel Rigg to Vindolanda. Vindolanda is not to be missed. If I had it to do over I would have opted for 3 nights at Henshaw Barn so we had a full day there.

Vindolanda is a very large fort and the civilian settlement that built up around it, still under excavation, along with a well done museum of the finds. Including personal letters, miraculously preserved and located that give insight into daily life.