Tag Archives: Cumbria

Carlisle to Lanercost Abbey

Most people “do” this 14 or so mile stretch in one day. The walking is pretty easy and even I could have done that (although it would have been a stretch), but we took two: Carlisle to Crosby-on-Eden, then Crosby-on_Eden to Lanercost Abbey.

We did this in order to backtrack a bit and spend the morning at the Tullie House Museum in Carlisle. This was a very worthwhile stop because we learned quite a bit about how to recognize the wall and the earthworks near it when un-excavated-which is most of the way. It made the walk into a sort of scavenger’s hunt.

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On this stretch you start out walking along the Eden River in Carlisle, the main charm of this stretch is the wildflowers along the way.

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It is a nice walk through Cumbrian countryside. The tower in the picture below is a folly, not an ancient fort.

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The weather was okay until we got to Crosby-on-Eden, then the wind came up. Overnight it really blew, and the next day was blustery–good English weather with lots of atmosphere. It was in the stretch between Crosby-on-Eden and Lanercost that you start to see the signs of the earthworks and un-excavated wall. The only parts of the wall itself that you see are the stones re-purposed in churches, manor houses, etc along the way.

The end of that section, Lanercost Abbey, a lot of the stones for the Abbey were initially part of Hadrian’s wall.

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Cee’s Which Way Photo Challenge

Solway Firth to Carlisle City

Since life is moving fast and my ability to process the pictures from our last trip is not, I’m hoping to, at least on and off, work through our experiences walking the English National Hadrian’s Wall Trail day-by-day. Maybe life will slow down or I’ll speed up…but I’m not banking on it. Walking the wall was a major accomplishment for me, I am not well balanced or athletic, so I feel a need to spend some time reflecting on it.

This small gallery shows the variety of walkways that make up the national trail.

On our second day of walking Hadrian’s Wall Walk was about 9 miles from Boustead Hill through Burgh-by-sands (pronounced Bruff-by-sands) and other smaller villages, then along the Eden River into the city of Carlisle, we walked along roads (both paved and dirt), through cow pastures, beside a river and on narrow nettle and blackberry lined walk ways.

Cee’s Which Way Photo Challenge