Tag Archives: fall

Almost Autumn

What passes for summer here in Seattle hasn’t quite let go, but signs of autumn are starting to show. Today’s dog walk showed signs of the seasons shifting.

The squirrels are active, we had to stop several times to see if they would come down and play…

…alas no. Even Ginger had to sit down after a while of waiting to see.

Even after several minutes the squirrel still didn’t come down, so Ginger finally let me lead her away. Is she stubborn or persistent?

These leaves are tinged with red, indicating autumn.
This dahlia is in full, glorious bloom, with buds coming on, indicating summer.
A quince about ready for harvest, indicating autumn.
Leaves starting to change, indicating autumn.
Fuschia in full summer glory.

Leaves starting to color shift for the new season:

Late summer cone flowers and a beautiful, shiny spider’s web for autumn.
The holly berries are reddening. Autumn’s colors foreshadowing winter.

My garden is still hopeful.

Maybe we’ll see an Indian summer.

For Ragtag’s daily post: autumn

P.S. Is anyone else having problems with WordPress letting you set a featured image?

A different kind of fall color: Hardy cyclamen

I adore hardy cyclamen, more known for its wonderful variegated leaves than its flowers. In early fall they bloom naked, then the leaves come out. Because the small flowers grow close to the ground it is hard to see and appreciate the delicate beauty of the blossoms on their curlicue tendrils without crawling on the ground. Here is a slug’s eye view:

You have to get close to appreciate hardy cyclamen in bloom. The small flowers on their curling tendrils grow close to the ground.
One has to get close to really appreciate these delicate beauties.
You have to get close to appreciate hardy cyclamen in bloom. The small flowers on their curling tendrils grow close to the ground.

For Sunshine’s Macro Monday and Cee’s Flower of the Day

Times they are a changin’

Winter is here. I don’t really care what the calendar says. It happened yesterday. In the morning the sun was shining and it wasn’t very cold, so I took the pups for a long-ish walk. It was still fall then.

By evening it was winter. Not cold snowy winters like the mid-west or east coast. The dark, wet enough to work the chilliness into your bones of a Puget Sound region winter. No doubt we’ll get a few more flashes of sunshine, but this time of year the sun arrives with a cold north wind.

I love it when Thanksgiving and Christmas are over a month apart. Things are less frantic. I’ve taken down the fall decorations and not put up the Christmas ones. I wait until December.

One benefit to the longer time between holidays is that most holiday special attractions are open this week, but not yet crowded. So today (while my spouse wrestled with the clogged drain in the kitchen… they really should saint that man!)I took myself off to visit the “Gingerbread Village”. I put “Gingerbread Village” in quotes because it’s more than gingerbread and more than a village. It is really sculptures. This year the theme is The Grinch Who Stole Christmas and the entries were imaginative and filled with fun details (to see any image larger click on it).

I called this one “Mount Crumpet”

I called this one “the grinch’s lair”:

This one was Whoville plus Mount Crumpit:

This one was Whoville:

Last, but not least, was “The Feast”:

They have official names somewhere but I was so entranced looking at the details that I didn’t catch them. For more information about the annual Gingerbread Village here is the website: GingerbreadVillage.org.
I wouldn’t say that I am ready for the holiday season to commence, but, after today’s outing I am feeling a good deal less hostile to it.

This fall has had it all

Weather-wise that is.

This fall has been a wild ride from a gorgeous Indian summer through a week of solid storms, to more gorgeous sunny days now back into a ten day forecast of storms. Snow, sleet, sun, wind, rain, sometimes all at once.

 

Response to Weekly Weather: Fall and Daily Post: Temporary