Tag Archives: SMM

There's one in every crowd

My first amaryllis bloom opened this morning. A welcome cheerful note on this gray day.

The stamens and pollen at the center of a red amaryllis.
A cheerful red on a gray day.

I got a group of three amaryllis for holiday cheer. Of course one of them has to be an over-achieving show-off… But in an amaryllis it’s cheerful and charming!

For Sunshine’s Macro Monday (I was sick on Monday) and Cee’s Flower of the Day.

A miniature forest

A miniature forest of moss and lichens lives on my apple tree.
A tiny grove of bright green moss on a dead branch.

The closer one looks at moss the more fascinated one becomes…at least if the one is I. I can imagine a “Horton hears a who” story taking place on these tiny worlds tucked into the nooks of my dwarf apple trees.

The moss on my apple trees was catching the low angle of November’s light when I got home from walking the dogs this morning.

It seems appropriate for Sunshine’s Macro Monday!

Up close and personal with sumac

Close up of the fruit cluster of the stag horn sumac.

I was out on a walk and noticed that several folks along my path had this interesting plant. I loved the velvety texture of what I know know to be a fruit cluster and the bright fall colors in the foliage.

Mama Cormier posted about it as a flower of the day earlier this month where I learned that it was sumac.

At once I wondered if it was the source for the Lebanese spice sumac. Research says it is a cousin: the type in my neighbor’s gardens is called staghorn and is indigenous, and common, on the eastern coast of America (not here on the west coast). The Lebanese spice comes from a European variety that is more purple than red. However, apparently the staghorn variety is also usable as a spice and some prefer it to the European. Here is an article about it.

For Sunshine’s Macro Monday

A different kind of fall color: Hardy cyclamen

I adore hardy cyclamen, more known for its wonderful variegated leaves than its flowers. In early fall they bloom naked, then the leaves come out. Because the small flowers grow close to the ground it is hard to see and appreciate the delicate beauty of the blossoms on their curlicue tendrils without crawling on the ground. Here is a slug’s eye view:

You have to get close to appreciate hardy cyclamen in bloom. The small flowers on their curling tendrils grow close to the ground.
One has to get close to really appreciate these delicate beauties.
You have to get close to appreciate hardy cyclamen in bloom. The small flowers on their curling tendrils grow close to the ground.

For Sunshine’s Macro Monday and Cee’s Flower of the Day